Javier A. Adachi, M.D., FACP, FIDSA

Javier A. Adachi, M.D., FACP, FIDSA

Assistant Professor

Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Teaching is a privilege and a responsibility. It always demands the best from us. It requires our commitment, honesty, passion, curiosity, enjoyment, collaboration and both an open-mind and an open-heart. Teaching allows us to share our knowledge and excitement, but most importantly, to learn from our patients, students and colleagues. We should always inspire our trainees to become better clinicians, better researchers and better educators. More than a century ago, Sir William Osler wrote: "The most difficult idea to introduce into the mind of doctors is that learning in medicine is not only a college or school course, it is a learning process that takes a lifetime." A principle even more valid now than ever before.

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  Mark A. Agostini, M.D.

Mark A. Agostini, M.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics

UT Southwestern Medical Center

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  Michael A. Ainsworth, M.D.

Michael A. Ainsworth, M.D.

Professor
Vice Dean for Academic Affairs, School of Medicine

Department of Internal Medicine

UT Medical Branch at Galveston

Engaging students in the process of learning clinical skills means identifying their starting point and providing them the pathway to master the skill. Observation, feedback and opportunities to practice in a structured environment give students the competence and confidence they need to succeed. My goal is to help students understand their strengths, appreciate what they need to learn and know when to ask for help.

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  Keith E. Argenbright, M.D., M.M.M.M.

Keith E. Argenbright, M.D., M.M.M.

Associate Professor
Director Moncrief Cancer Institute
Simmons Cancer Center Chief
Community Health Sciences

Dept. of Clinical Sciences

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Teaching is the essence of our profession. Health care leaders are called upon to be effective teachers and mentors to less experienced physicians and scientists. As William Osler said, "No bubble is so iridescent or floats longer than that blown by the successful teacher."

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  Michell S. Barratt, M.D., M.P.H.

Michelle S. Barratt, M.D., M.P.H.

Professor

Department of Pediatrics

UT Health Science Center at Houston

My personal mission is nurturing learners to excellence in pediatric care through role modeling and relationship. I thrive on interacting with learners in all types of educational encounters, but most especially while we care for pediatric patients together. I am invigorated by the exchange of ideas and by the enlistment of learner and patient/parent in the therapeutic plan. I am a lifelong learner and especially passionate to model for my learners "I don't know either, let's look it up!"

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  Ravi Bhoja, M.D.

Ravi Bhoja, M.D.

Associate Professor, Distinguished Teaching Professor

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Watching the light bulb go off when a student grasps a difficult subject truly is the most gratifying aspect of teaching. I believe that targeting students' learning styles has tremendous value and affords them a better understanding of the concepts being taught. People have a variety of learning methods — auditory, visual, kinesthetic and experiential — but most tend to have a preferred method, especially when encountering a challenging topic. Teaching must be a dynamic process to capture these different learners. I believe using a variety of modalities such as didactics, problem-based learning, Socratic questioning, on-line tutorials, as well as clinical simulation, helps ensure that students remain engaged.

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  Barry R. Botterman, Ph.D.

Barry R. Botterman, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Department of Cell Biology

UT Southwestern Medical Center

As an educator in the anatomical sciences, my goal is to provide a learning environment that challenges students, engages them and allows for self-discovery and acquisition of anatomical knowledge through dissection. Laboratory exercises are designed to foster teamwork among students, an important quality to have as they go forward in their clinical training and as future physicians. I strive to present anatomical concepts with a perspective that is clinically relevant, in the hope that students will continue to use what they have learned in anatomy over the course of their professional careers.

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  Adam M. Brenner, M.D.

Adam M. Brenner, M.D.

Associate Professor, Distinguished Teaching Professor, Vice Chair for Education and Director of Residency Training in Psychiatry

Department of Psychiatry

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Our patients often have concerns that are hard to talk about, sometimes because of their sadness, shame, or anger. With this in mind I often focus on teaching students and residents how to help patients tell them what they are most concerned about. Sharing their most difficult concerns can be crucial in both comforting the patient and also in forming a real partnership in managing an illness together. I try to teach this through lectures, by role modeling, and by offering the same kind of attention to our trainees.

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  Patricia M. Butler, M.D.

Patricia M. Butler, M.D.

Professor
Vice Dean, Office of Educational Programs

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

UT Health Science Center at Houston

My role as an educator has afforded me great personal reward and fulfillment. I am fortunate to work with outstanding faculty as we educate and prepare our students to provide exemplary patient care. We want to instill in our students a love of learning that will sustain them throughout their professional lives.

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  Stephen C. Cannon, M.D., Ph.D.

Stephen C. Cannon, M.D., Ph.D.

Patricia A. Smith Distinguished Chair in Neuromuscular Research
Professor of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education

UT Southwestern Medical Center

For me, the act of learning brings many rewards; the satisfaction of understanding something new about the world around us, the thrill from knowing how or why and the sense of accomplishment from gaining a new skill. I teach because I want to share this enthusiasm with students, to see them delight in their own achievement and to teach them how to learn independently and become tomorrow's teachers.

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  William P. Clarke, Ph.D.

William P. Clarke, Ph.D.

Professor
Distinguished Teaching Professor

Department of Pharmacology

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

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  Margaret O'Brien Caughy, Sc.D.

Margaret O'Brien Caughy, Sc.D.

Professor
Director, Maternal and Child Health Training Program
Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences
Dallas Regional Campus
UT School of Public Health

UT Health Science Center at Houston

I believe strongly that my role as teacher does not end at the classroom door. Public health is about working in the community to create opportunities for change and improved health, and you can't learn how to do that by sitting in a classroom. I like to involve students with me in my work with public health agencies and practitioners. By seeing public health in action, students see how to use their knowledge from the classroom and become excited about a career in public health. Witnessing this blossoming of passion for public health in my students is the best part of teaching for me.

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  Jennifer Anne Cuthbert, M.B.B.S., M.D.

Jennifer Anne Cuthbert, M.B.B.S., M.D.

Professor

Department of Internal Medicine

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Rather than teach, I want to stimulate learning by facilitating and guiding the learner during their acquisition of knowledge. My other goal is that of encouraging contextual and experiential learning by providing a role model at the bedside and in the clinic. Helping the novice on the path toward being a self-driven, lifelong learner is its own reward.

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  Catherine M. Flaitz, D.D.S., M.S.

Catherine M. Flaitz, D.D.S., M.S.

Distinguished Teaching Professor

Department of Diagnostic and Biomedical Sciences

UT Health Science Center at Houston

Teaching can be compared to the performing arts. It demands expertise and immersion into the subject, genuine engagement of the audience, a believable storytelling quality and a passion for creating a stimulating environment. The goal is to leave the learners on the edge of their seats so they are hungry for more.

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  Vicki S. Freeman, Ph.D., M.L.S. (ASCP) SC, FACB

Vicki S. Freeman, Ph.D., M.L.S. (ASCP) SC, FACB

Chair and Professor
Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences
Director, Academy of Master Teachers and Marie Hall Scholar
A.H. Potthast Distinguished Professor University of Texas Distinguished Teaching Professor

UT Medical Branch at Galveston

Walt Disney once said, "If you can dream it, you can do it." With this motto in mind, I believe that all individuals should have an opportunity to advance their knowledge in their chosen profession, even when circumstances seem to limit their access. It is our responsibility as faculty and as institutions of higher education to provide educational opportunities in multiple avenues for individuals to obtain their education. As a teacher, I seek to guide students through the learning process by inspiring them to learn, then providing them with a variety of materials and experiences so they feel engaged in their field of study.

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  Elliot M. Frohman, M.D., Ph.D., FAAN

Elliot M. Frohman, M.D., Ph.D., FAAN

Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology
Kenney-Marie Dixon Pickens Distinguished Professor of MS Research
Irene Wadel and Robert Atha Distinguished Chair in Neurology
Director, Multiple Sclerosis Program and Clinical Center for Multiple Sclerosis

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Three Philosphy Notes:

A. In medicine and research, more important than "being right" is knowing how to proceed with those processes that are germane to "getting it right."

B. In addressing the most complex of problems, collaboration will almost always eclipse competition and the work of individuals.

C. Great physicians and educators understand that we rarely experience the magnitude of joy and satisfaction of those things we receive in this life, when compared to those things we give to others. Teaching is but one; albeit a very powerful example of a unique and powerful gift to students, which has the legacy value in that these recipients of learning go on to apply their knowledge in their role of helping others, and are at the same time influenced and transformed into educators themselves, who perpetuate the cycle of exuberance and love for learning and teaching.

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  Richard Wilder Goodgame, M.D.

Richard Wilder Goodgame, M.D.

Professor
Vice Chairman for Graduate Medical Education
Director for Internal Medicine Residency

UT Medical Branch at Galveston

To teach once is to learn twice. I teach to learn; I learn to teach. The valued gifts that good teachers bring to lectures and teachable moments: accuracy, brevity, clarity, energy, levity and memory.

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  David E. Greenberg, M.D.

David E. Greenberg, M.D.

Assistant Professor

Department of Internal Medicine and Microbiology

UT Southwestern Medical Center

When teaching, I strive to put those myriad of facts which bombard students into real life situations. I find that when I am able to mold what seems like random pieces of information into a clinical context, the students not only remember the material, but can also apply it at a much deeper level. It is particularly gratifying to see the student enter the hospital, excited and passionate to experience in real life what they have been taught in the classroom.

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  Joanne V. Hickey, Ph.D., R.N., APRN, ACNP-BC, FAAN, FCCM

Joanne V. Hickey, Ph.D., R.N., APRN, ACNP-BC, FAAN, FCCM

Professor
Patricia L. Starck/PARTNERS
Professorship in Nursing
School of Nursing
Coordinator, Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

Department of Family Health

UT Health Science Center at Houston

Education is transformational; it not only increases one's knowledge and expertise, but also supports a commitment to, and excitement for, lifelong learning. An effective teacher creates a learning environment of respect for learning and an openness to new ideas considered in a context of analysis and critique. This leads to integration of knowledge and innovation into practice and patient care. Being a teacher, I am privileged to have the opportunity to influence the growth and development of students as critical thinkers and leaders who apply their knowledge to achieve optimal outcomes for countless individuals and populations.

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  M. Sriram Iyengar, Ph.D., Btech, M.S., M.S.C.S.

M. Sriram Iyengar, Ph.D., B. Tech, M.S., M.S.C.S.

Associate Professor

School of Biomedical Informatics

UT Health Science Center at Houston

What I try hardest to impart to students is why my subject, biomedical informatics is, wonderful, exciting and important. Also, how they can advance the field, and how their contributions could improve people's lives.

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  Archie A. Jones, D.D.S., M.B.A.

Archie A. Jones, D.D.S., M.B.A.

Distinguished Teaching Professor
Director, Predoctoral Division

Department of Periodontics

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

I strive to maintain the highest quality of teaching that I can provide for our health science students. They deserve no less from the faculty. Hopefully, they leave us with a passion for learning that becomes lifelong learning. Over the long term, the biggest renewal of my energies still comes from the students who return after graduation and say, "You know, you did a good job getting me ready. I just didn't see it at the time."

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  Hagop M. Kantarjian, M.D.

Hagop M. Kantarjian, M.D.

Chairman

Department of Leukemia

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

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  Khandan Keyomarsi, Ph.D.

Khandan Keyomarsi, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

My main goal as a mentor has always been to help the mentees become independent thinkers and owners of their own ideas. I also challenge my mentees to move beyond their comfort zone or what they consider to be their limitations, while maintaining a safe learning environment for taking risks. This has resulted in not only their development as future leaders, but also provided me with opportunities to learn from them.

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  Lillian S. Kao, M.D, M.S., FACS

Lillian S. Kao, M.D, M.S., FACS

Professor

Department of Surgery

UT Health Science Center at Houston

In "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother," Amy Chua states that tiger mothers "believe that their children can be the best students, that academic achievement reflects successful parenting, and that if children did not excel at school then there was a problem and parents were not doing their job." As a teacher, I feel a responsibility to my students (my "children") to believe in them and to expect the best from them, to invest my time and energy into their lessons, and to share accountability for their learning. In doing so, I take great joy and pride in their successes and commiserate and learn with them in their failures. It is both empowering and humbling to see the accomplishments of all of those that I have been privileged to teach.

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  Henry M. Kuerer, M.D., Ph.D., FACS

Henry M. Kuerer, M.D., Ph.D., FACS

Professor

Department of Surgical Oncology

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Tremendous opportunity, responsibility and honor are given to clinical faculty members, as our trainees will impact not only thousands of their own patients but generations of future physicians, patients and their families. What has delighted me over the years has been our trainees' curiosity and uncanny ability to surprise and challenge us with their own innovative ideas and thus assisting directly with advancing the quality of our education, research and patient-centered care.

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  Ruth E. Levine, M.D.

Ruth E. Levine, M.D.

Clarence Ross Miller Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Assistant Dean for Educational Affairs
Director, Office of Clinician Education

UT Medical Branch at Galveston

I believe that being a good teacher is kind of like being a therapist; under the best of circumstances the student should come away feeling supported, enlightened and with an increased understanding not just about the subject at hand but about themselves. When I can help make this happen, there is no better feeling in the world.

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  Steven A. Lieberman, M.D., FACP

Steven A. Lieberman, M.D., FACP

Professor
Senior Dean for Administration

Department of Internal Medicine

UT Medical Branch at Galveston

Our students are so talented and motivated, with a fertile environment and attentive mentoring, they will far exceed our expectations.

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  Archie A. Jones, D.D.S., M.B.A.

Linda M. McManus, Ph.D.

Distinguished Teaching Professor

Department of Pathology and Periodontics

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

Teaching enables a foundation for learning and preparation for the future. My renewable reward for teaching and the source of much personal pride is the success of my learners and mentees as they apply knowledge, concepts, understanding and problem-solving skills toward individual career goals.

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  Angela P. Mihalic, M.D.

Angela P. Mihalic, M.D.

Professor of Pediatrics
Associate Dean for Student Affairs

Department of Pediatrics

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Nothing has driven me to learn and be the best physician I can be than to be able to teach my learners clinical skills, role model communication and interpersonal skills, and provide guidance to learners on topics of ethics and professionalism.

Nothing brings more joy than seeing the excitement in learners when they connect with a concept and supporting and encouraging their desire to go beyond and seek out answers to additional clinical and foundation of science questions. What inspires me is the ability to harness the creativity and curiosity of students, to take that idea or interest and develop a new educational offering that allows learners the opportunity for professional growth.

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  Kevin A. Morano, Ph.D.

Kevin A. Morano, Ph.D.

Professor

Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics

UT Health Science Center at Houston

One of the best motivational aspects of teaching is the satisfaction and reward from a learner's accomplishment, whether it be a high grade in class, a great paper in the lab or a junior faculty member getting their first major grant.

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  Pierre F. Neuenschwander, Ph.D., FAHA

Pierre F. Neuenschwander, Ph.D., FAHA

Associate Professor
Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology
Executive Director of Academic Administration

Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology

UT Health Science Center at Tyler

While I try to impart state-of-the-art knowledge in the classroom, I realize that what I tell my students today may very well be outdated tomorrow. So I believe that teaching a student to learn how to learn is integral to their future success. Explaining to them how the knowledge was obtained, and the history behind the discoveries, helps them develop their own thought processes and allows them to hone their critical thinking skills.

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  Steven A. Lieberman, M.D., FACP

Virginia N. Niebuhr, Ph.D.

Professor
UT System Distinguished Teaching Professor

Department of Pediatrics

UT Medical Branch at Galveston

"If we teach today like we taught yesterday, we rob our students of tomorrow." -- John Dewey

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  Jay I. Peters, M.D.

Jay I. Peters, M.D.

Professor
Chief, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

I have been told that a good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination and instill a love of learning in the students they teach. As a physician, I feel that I should try to instill the passion for "lifelong learning" into each of the medical students, residents and fellows that I help train. My philosophy toward the teaching of medicine is based on the belief that my role is not merely to organize and present information but to lead them through a process of discovery and the ability to solve clinical problems. To that end, I work hard to be sure that students are self-directed and critically reflective about their own learning. I'm more interested in arousing enthusiasm than merely teaching the facts. I believe in the concept that "The facts may change, but that enthusiasm for exploring the world will remain with them the rest of their lives."

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  Linda Porter-Wenzlaff Ph.D., R.N., LPC, MSN, MA, CENP, NEA-BC, CNE, SSBB, NCC

Linda Porter-Wenzlaff
Ph.D., R.N., LPC, MSN, MA, CENP, NEA-BC, CNE, SSBB, NCC

Clinical Associate Professor
Distinguished Teaching Professor

Department of Health Restoration and Care Systems Management

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

I work to co-create safe, challenging learning opportunities that support each student's individual existential development, as well as the intellectual capacities, practice competencies and values that will sustain a successful life of evolving professional service. We learn and grow together, and I am humbled by the opportunity to influence the future through their potential.

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  Ruben D. Restrepo, M.D., RRT

Ruben D. Restrepo, M.D., RRT

Professor

Department of Respiratory Care

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

Teaching is a privilege. Educating those who will provide the best care to our patients with respiratory diseases is an honor that comes with a great deal of responsibility. I have found inspiration and passion to teach by learning from my students as much as they learn from me. It is the students who made who I am as a teacher.

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  Ivy S. Schwartz, D.D.S., M.S.Ed.

Ivy S. Schwartz, D.D.S., M.S.Ed.

Distinguished Teaching Professor

Department of Comprehensive Dentistry

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

My educational philosophy is based on developing competent dentists, and by example, encouraging students to strive for excellence in clinical care, continue lifelong learning and serve their patients using not only appropriate evidence-based dentistry but their hearts." The diversity and unique strengths of the students as they address the dental needs of their patients generates unique educational learning experiences every day for the students as well as me. I hope I inspire students to be the best they can be, maintain high ethical standards, put patients' needs first and remember that the practice of dentistry is not a right, but a privilege.

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  Beatrice J. Selwyn, Sc.D., M.Sc.Hyg.

Beatrice J. Selwyn, Sc.D., M.Sc.Hyg.

Associate Professor
Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental
Sciences
Division of Management, Policy and Community Health
Co-Coordinator, Global Health Concentration

Department of Family Health

UT Health Science Center at Houston

"The student masters. The teacher serves." A guiding concept taught to me by the founding Dean of the School of Public Health, Dr. Reuel A. Stallones, during my first week as a new faculty member. For me, a teacher facilitates other's learning by practicing servant-leadership, where the student and teacher are collaborators in endeavors of discovery and synthesis. I enjoy guiding students to walk the path of the unknown, of discovery, developing their competence and responding to their curiosity, so each student can learn to make their unique contribution to their field. My philosophy and practice reflect my belief that public health students need knowledge, but they must also acquire practical skills and habits of thinking, to engage in the complexity of issues in population health work and research.

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  Frank J. Weaker, Ph.D.

Frank J. Weaker, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

Department of Cellular and Structural Biology

UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

I believe a teacher facilitates learning, which requires a knowledge of the profession, but more importantly, the ability to identify difficult concepts and to devise ways to explain these topics.

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  Robert A. Wolff, M.D.

Robert A. Wolff, M.D.

Professor
Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan
Distinguished University Chair of Medical Oncology
Deputy Division Head, Clinical and Educational Affairs

Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology

UT MD Anderson Cancer Center

Teaching, like medicine, is more art than science. Teaching, like medicine, takes practice. Teaching, like medicine, has immeasurable rewards.

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