Mohammad Mainul Akbar, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Mathematical Sciences

The University of Texas at Dallas

My teaching philosophy is to shape junior colleagues who see the world through the lens of mathematics and also see mathematics as a world in itself. I want them to be active citizens in both worlds, to appreciate that mathematics is the finest construct of the human imagination and, at the same time, that it constitutes the language of almost every discourse of modern civilization.

Return to Top

 

Josephine Caldwell-Ryan, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Graduate Advisor
Department of Sociology and Anthropology

The University of Texas at Arlington

In addition to delivering high-quality course content, I want my students to see learning, thinking and teaching as valuable skills that will enhance their quality of life long after they leave the classroom. I want them to ask questions, look for answers and find meaning and satisfaction in the process.

Return to Top

 

Martin "Randy" Cox

Senior Lecturer and Director of Individual Events
Department of Communication Studies

The University of Texas at Austin

There is no more relevant or important skill in contemporary education than the ability to hold, present and defend vigorously our perspectives through the articulation of that information and meaning. My teaching philosophy stipulates that every aspect of human thought and action can be thought of as a text, and that the entire process of communication is defined by its influences, intentions and interruptions. My philosophy mandates that every brand of academic thought has importance in the way that we choose to interpret human ideas. The history of human thought and communication can be perceived as a series of modes that inform and extend meaning.

Return to Top

 

Kathryn Dawson

Assistant Professor
Department of Theatre and Dance

The University of Texas at Austin

I am committed to a dialogic, collaborative learning environment. I create a space and place where risk-taking and embodied engagement interconnect with critical thinking and an investigation of human behavior and relationships.  I believe an arts-based approach to instruction actively engages participants in their education, enabling them to become advocates for their own emotional and intellectual development.

Return to Top

 

Cassandra Delgado-Reyes, Ph.D.

Assistant Director and Specialist
Texas Interdisciplinary Plan, College of Natural Sciences

The University of Texas at Austin

Teach a student a fact, they can answer a question. Teach a student how to think, they can ask their own questions.

Return to Top

 

Gustavo G. Dietrich

Lecturer
Department of Computer Science

The University of Texas-Pan American

I strive to be a compassionate educator that cares not only about the student's learning of the specific subject matter of the course but also about those aspects that will make them better human beings. I always tell my students “when I see you, I see my children” and that is how I treat them.

Return to Top

 

Ann Gabbert, Ph.D.

Lecturer and Associate Director of Student Support
Entering Student Program

The University of Texas at El Paso

In a classic Saturday Night Live sketch from the 1970s, Father Guido Sarducci proposes the Five Minute University, suggesting that universities should only teach what students remember five years after graduation. While I acknowledge that gaining hard factual knowledge is of course desirable, ultimately I want my students to leave my courses with the ability to think critically; communicate articulately, both verbally and in writing; be able to work with others while considering different points of view; and take personal responsibility for their actions, continually self-assessing and adjusting their behavior in order to improve. If my students can still do these things five years after graduation, even if they cannot remember the details of a historical event, I feel that I have been successful as a teacher.

Return to Top

 

Karen Huxtable-Jester, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

The University of Texas at Dallas

To me, excellent teaching begins with deep respect for students, their goals and the experiences that have brought them to this particular point in their lives.  Our students are wonderfully bright and talented, and their desire to learn is inspiring.  In every class, my fundamental goal is to bring about change in the ways students think about learning, development and motivation.  To achieve deep and lasting change I must challenge students to question their current level of understanding and come to see that by evaluating assumptions, evidence and conclusions they can better understand ideas, and generate new ideas, that matter to their lives and goals.

Return to Top

 

James A. Karboski, Pharm.D.

Clinical Professor
College of Pharmacy

The University of Texas at Austin

My goal is to guide these intelligent and highly motivated students through the difficult transition from college student to valued healthcare provider. While they are expected to process large volumes of information at an unprecedented pace, I strive to help them understand their purpose is not merely to achieve high marks, but to focus on acquiring the knowledge and skills required to serve the evolving healthcare needs of our communities.

Return to Top

 

Dave McIntyre

Senior Lecturer, Art Education
Department of Art

The University of Texas at El Paso

As an art educator I have the unique opportunity of helping students to define themselves as leaders and visionaries in the field of teaching. My own teaching philosophy stresses the importance of visual literacy in life experiences and the artistic and visual components of critical analysis and higher order applications in learning. I strive to prepare future visual art teachers to be important contributors to the success of all children in our educational system and in our culture.

Return to Top

 

Lindsay G. Ratcliffe, M.A.

Lecturer II
The Writing Program

The University of Texas at San Antonio

For me, learning and teaching are inseparable processes. My own favorite teachers always seemed to position themselves as my fellow learners; rather than "instructing down to" students, they seemed to "learn along with" them, taking apparent joy in the process of discovery through discussion. At UTSA, I have certainly delighted in exploring complex issues with my students, who perennially challenge my perspectives and help me grow as a teacher.

Return to Top

 

K Sata Sathasivan, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
School of Biological Sciences

The University of Texas at Austin

I like to prepare the students for real life by making them not only understand the concepts in biology but also be able to apply them to solve problems and to help them become innovators.

Return to Top

 

Elizabeth Stepp, Ph.D.

Lecturer
Department of Mathematics

The University of Texas at Austin








Return to Top

 

Seiichiro Tanizaki, Ph.D.

Lecturer
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

The University of Texas at Arlington

My job as their instructor is to help my students get beyond their chemistry anxiety and to learn: to learn chemistry, for sure, but also to learn how to study, to learn how to challenge themselves and to learn that they can succeed.  Most of students come to my classes with negative feelings toward chemistry. I hope to change that through my teaching.

Return to Top

 

Yvette Pearson Weatherton, Ph.D., P.E.

Associate Chair and Sr. Lecturer
UT Arlington Provost's Award Recipient (2010 and 2012)
Department of Civil Engineering

The University of Texas at Arlington

I have been an engineering educator for nearly 20 years now, and I still believe that two of the greatest skills that I acquired from my undergraduate education were how to think and how to learn.  These are not only important in engineering, but also in life in general.  I strive to instill the importance of critical thinking and lifelong learning in my students by incorporating various techniques into classroom instruction, engaging them in activities that develop them wholly and encouraging them to pursue goals beyond their academic achievements.

Return to Top

The University of Texas System. Nine Universities. Six Health Institutions. Unlimited Possibilities. www.utsystem.edu